No Record But Still the Same Old Tune

The district court eloquently described the case’s status and defendants’ post-trial motion following a jury verdict in favor of the plaintiffs.  My favorite sentence in this passage is “Ultimately, the goal is to make a dispute understandable to a lay person.”:

While the world has moved beyond the free-MP3-download craze, the parties in this case have not. This hard-fought litigation spans 7 years and 628 docket entries. Numerous substantive motions were heard. And decisions by this Court did not deter the parties from revisiting the same issues time and again. As trial approached, the parties launched salvos of motions in limine seeking to resurrect discovery disputes, relitigate prior motions, and level an impressive array of claims and defenses. 

A primary function of pre-trial litigation is to distill claims. Ultimately, the goal is to make a dispute understandable to a lay person. Despite this Court’s efforts to winnow the issues, the parties insisted on an 82-page verdict sheet on liability and a 331-page verdict sheet on damages that included dense Excel tables, necessitating at least one juror’s use of a magnifying glass. While the jury did its best, their assignment was beyond all reasonable scale.

To understand how this happened, one must look at the impetus for this litigation. Robertson created a business model designed to operate at the very periphery of copyright law.  While Robertson’s business practices sometimes infringed copyrights, many of the Plaintiffs’ claims were just too big to succeed. Plaintiffs’ evidence on their most significant theories of liability—red flag knowledge and willful blindness—was sparse. And Robertson—by his words, actions, and demeanor—came across as unworthy of belief. That led the jury to rely on something other than the evidence in reaching portions of its verdict. For the following reasons, Robertson’s motions are granted in part and denied in part.

(Opinion pdf pages 1-2).

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Copyright Distribution Infringement Discrete from Copying Infringement

Andrew Diversey, a Ph.D. linguistics student at the University of New Mexico (UNM), sued several administrators and members of the Board of Regents for infringing his copyright in his unpublished dissertation.  Without Diversey’s authorization, a draft of his dissertation was deposited at the UMN Zimmerman Library and was sent to ProQuest, UNM’s dissertation publisher.  The district court ruled that Diversey’s claims were barred by the three year statute of limitations.  The Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals distinguished Diversey’s claim for unauthorized copying from his claim for unauthorized distribution and affirmed in part and reversed in part.

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